Social Contexts and Policies of Education (Academic Unit)Consortium for Higher Education Research in Asia

Education in China’s Greater Bay Area


How Can the Universities and Academic Profession Contribute?


December 15, 2020 (Tuesday) 15:00-16:30 (Hong Kong Time)
This first forum serves to shed light on the strategic role which can be played by Hong Kong’s world-class universities and the international academic profession in the regionalization of innovation systems in the GBA. The expected opportunities and challenges offered by the GBA policy initiatives will also be explored. On the other side, whether the universities in the GBA have provided adequate and sought-after talent pool in fulfilling the industrial growth of the region will be investigated. The complementarity between regions of the GBA is reflected through an empirical study which shows the correlation between university discipline and industrial structure in Shenzhen, Hong Kong and Macau.

Chair

Dr Jisun Jung The University of Hong Kong

Speaker

Dr Hayes TangThe Education University of Hong Kong

Speaker

Ms Zhu Kejin Southern University of Science and Technology

Discussant

Prof Gerard Postiglione The University of Hong Kong

Discussant

Dr Ma Jinyuan Southern University of Science and Technology

The strategic role of world-class universities in regional innovation system: China’s Greater Bay Area and Hong Kong’s academic profession

Dr Hayes Tang

The Education University of Hong Kong

This presentation examines the strategic role of world-class universities and the international academic profession in the regionalisation project of China’s Greater Bay Area (GBA). Focusing on the case of Hong Kong, it engages in policy and stakeholder analysis and addresses three key research questions: (1) What are the competitive advantages and potential strategic role of Hong Kong's universities and academic profession in the regionalisation of innovation systems in the GBA? (2) What is the role of the governments in the regionalisation processes? (3) What are the expected opportunities and challenges offered by the GBA policy initiatives for the future development of Hong Kong’s universities and academic profession? Hong Kong-based scientists and researchers possess the competitive advantages of basic research and international partnerships. They are highly regarded by the Chinese central government as they can play an important role in achieving China’s aspiration of becoming a global technology power. The paper illustrates the way in which the GBA regionalisation project offers a wealth of empirical cases for understanding of the role of international social capital in an entrepreneurial knowledge economy, dynamics between basic and applied research, as well as interactions and tensions in the Triple Helix relationship of university, government and industry. It adds novel contextual understanding to the literature of the Triple Helix model, which largely draws on inductive theorising from western successful innovation cases.

An empirical study on the correlation between university discipline and industrial structure in the Guangdong, Hong Kong, and Macao Greater Bay Area

Ms Zhu Kejin

Southern University of Science and Technology

This presentation examines the correlation between university discipline and industrial structure in the context of the integration and development of the Guangdong-Hong Kong-Macau Greater Bay Area (GBA). It aims to determine the industrial structure deviation, and further identify human resource shortages and complementarity through the lens of the university discipline layout in Shenzhen, Hong Kong and Macau of the GBA. A Pearson correlation approach was employed to determine the magnitude and strength of the relationship between regional university discipline and industrial structure in the GBA. The most significant empirical result suggests that industrial structure deviation exists in the secondary industries of both Guangdong and Hong Kong. This indicates the complementarity between regions of the GBA: the number of science and engineering talents graduating from the universities in Hong Kong exceeds the demands of Hong Kong’s local needs, while the science and engineering talents cultivated by universities in Guangdong cannot satisfy the needs of its secondary industries. Based on its findings, this study calls for a talent ecosystem that is beneficial for talent flow, talent sharing, and talent cultivation in a complementary manner.

Coordinator

Dr Alice Te The University of Hong Kong